Infrared Photography: Images of Unseen Color

I finally found an article with very good examples of infrared photography. When these infrared filters are used together with infrared-sensitive film or sensors, very interesting “in-camera effects” can be obtained; false-color or black-and-white images with a dreamlike or sometimes lurid appearance known as the “Wood Effect.” The effect is mainly caused by foliage (such as tree leaves and grass) strongly reflecting in the same way visible light is reflected from snow. Chlorophyll is transparen’t at these wavelengths and so does not block this reflectance (see Red edge). There is a small contribution from chlorophyll fluorescence, but this is extremely small and is not the real cause of the brightness seen in infrared photographs. Source

Easily Make Your Own Homemade Photography Filters that Work

Yes, I’m serious, this it’s not a joke. You can create homemade photography filters for your camera (either digital or film). And yes, it’s incredible easy. homemade infrared filter: a piece of developed unexposed slide film OR a floppy disk ! homemade blue filter: a piece of exposed developed slide film with methyl blue homemade yellow filter: a piece of exposed developed slide film with methyl yellow IR Filter For obtaining the home made IR filter you need: piece of developed unexposed slide film or a floppy disk. You must go at the photo store and ask for developing the unexposed film. The home-made filter typically begins transmission at around 710-730nm. “Congo Blue” theater gels are designed to pass IR light in order to avoid damage from heating. When combined with red filters which block their visible blue, the combination is reported to pass the shorter wavelengths of infrared up to … Read more…

IR Filter and Infrared Photography

An infrared filter is a filter to remove visible light and only pass infrared light in different wavelengths. Here are some types of IR filter to choose from: • The Kodak Wratten 87, 87A, 87B, 87C (87 starting at 750nm, 87C at 800nm, 87B at 850nm, 87A at 950nm) • The Hoya R72 (High quality filter starting at 720nm, which includes some visible light) • The Hoya RM90 (High quality filter starting at 900nm) • The Hoya RM100 (High quality filter starting at 1000nm) • The M&K 1000 (High quality filter starting at 1000nm) • The M&K 093 and 095 (starting at 830nm) When these filters are used together with infrared-sensitive film or sensors, very interesting “in-camera effects” can be obtained; false-color or black-and-white images with a sometimes lurid appearance known as the “Wood Effect“. There is no doubt that infrared B&W photos have some dreamlike magic as these photos … Read more…

Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy